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Blue Ridge

Blue Ridge

“We Are From”

Foreground is a pool of clear water. Rocks slope upward from the pool towards a cascading waterfall. Pine trees and rhododendron frame the falls and pools on either side.

Widow’s Creek Falls at Stone Mountain State Park

We are from daypacks.
From Crazy Creek chairs and Nalgene bottles.
We are from North Carolina (mountain, piedmont, and coastal plain).
We are are from white pines, five needles per fascicle, open cones, fast-growing.
We are from group norms and trip goals.
From Melissa, Megan, and Chris.
We are from lifelong learners and explorers.
From “choose your own adventure” and “leave no trace.”
We are from Mother Nature and unplug, recharge.
We are from schools and museums.
Trail mix and Clif bars.
From eating our first meal in a bag to Chris showing us how to slide down Widow’s Creek Falls.
From using our five senses to notice, wonder, and reminisce.
Nature journals, data collection, cell phone pictures, and group stories.
We are from different backgrounds and experiences, but we all share the desire to inspire new explorers.

Foreground is a pool of clear water. Rocks slope upward from the pool creating a natural waterslide. A person is standing at the top of the slide, and another person is sliding down. Pine trees and rhododendron frame a waterfall and pools on either side.

Waterfall sliding at Widow’s Creek Falls at Stone Mountain State Park, NC

Looking down into a plastic zip top bag containing a freeze-dried meal that has been rehydrated. A spoon is sticking out of the bag towards the camera.

First meal of the trip, rehydrated meals in a bag!

Blue Ridge

“Seeing the World Through Each Others’ Eyes”

“It’s been a rough year for all of us – teachers, students, and parents alike. Some of us fit in all 3 categories. Some of us have endured personal trauma or have been close to colleagues who have. The loss is overwhelming, and I’m not solely talking about loss of life. I’m speaking of a deeper loss we can all share. A loss of freedom and exploration; a loss of continuity and tradition; a loss of social interactions and mental wellness; a loss of smiles, hugs and high fives; a loss of normalcy. Yet throughout this loss, I feel we have gained something else. I have been amazed at how we have united to support each other emotionally and spiritually. I have seen everlasting friendships formed through synchronous trials and tribulations. We’ve all learned quite a bit more about technology than we thought we’d ever learn in our lifetimes. We’ve learned our own strengths and weaknesses, and how to survive on both.

This “adventure” has reminded me that there is more to these kids than reading fluency and math strategies. We were suddenly forced by the universe to adapt to our new surroundings without warning, and what we discovered while in this new phase was ugly, yet simultaneously wondrous. We got an 18-month long sneak peek into our kids’ lives, inside their homes, their personal relationships – we got to see the world through their eyes

One thing that remained consistent throughout virtual or face-to-face teaching was spreading my love of hiking and the outdoors to my kids, even to students in other classes. I would share my adventures on the trails (along with photos) with my students, especially if it was something really cool (like rappelling off of an 80’ cliff, ziplining through the trees, or summiting a peak alone at sunset) and explain to them jubilantly how I was conquering my fear of heights while immersing myself in nature. It lit up their faces. I want to continue to bring that joy and wonder to my students, to instill that curiosity, to see the good in the world – through my eyes.

When school ended in May and we said our goodbyes, all I could think about was the one thing that got me through this school year – anticipating the Educators of Excellence Institute in the Blue Ridge Mountains this summer. Learning more about my passion in an environment that has such meaning to me caused me to spend months preparing for this unique experience with fewer than a dozen other teachers from around the state. This, to me, is not work. This is my “play.” This is how I bring nature into the classroom, how I show them to explore. This is how we make connections and see the world through each others’ eyes.”

~Becqui Masters, First Grade Teacher, Central Elementary School, Pasquotank County

 

Lenae Scafidi, Science teacher at Iredell High School in Iredell County, has also been eagerly anticipating her Educators of Excellence Institute by exploring with her family along the Blue Ridge Parkway. She heard we’d be looking for hellbenders and hiking, so she got a head start!

A masked teacher watches a hellbender in a tank

“Hunting” hellbenders at the Western NC Nature Center

 

Teacher and her son hike in a mountain forest along the Blue Ridge Parkway

Lenae had the opportunity to hike with her son earlier this summer along the Blue Ridge Parkway.